• 최종편집 2020-09-22(화)

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  • ‘I Am Going to Physically Explode’: Mom Rage in a Pandemic
    After I wrote a personal essay on mom rage in 2019, strangers on Twitter declared me an unfit mother. But I expected Twitter-hate. What I did not expect were the many emails I received from mothers around the world, saying they too struggle with mom rage and my story made them feel less alone. After the initial flood of emails, a trickle continued over the next six months. Then Covid-19 happened, and with it, stay-at-home orders. My inbox began lighting up again, illuminating a direct correlation between mom rage and sheltering in place. “Mom rage” is the colloquial term for the unrestrained anger many women experience during pregnancy, postpartum and beyond. It is a popular topic these days in a support group for working moms at The Motherhood Center, a clinical treatment facility in Manhattan that offers services for pregnant and postpartum women. Paige Bellenbaum, a group facilitator and the center’s founding director, said, “Mom rage is something we talk about all the time. Social isolation, lack of support, managing high levels of anxiety and stress-this is the new normal of being a mother, and during the pandemic in particular.” Anger and rage are waving red flags hinting at feelings below the surface. Mothers who experience rage may be feeling alone, unheard, and unsupported, Bellenbaum said. “But it’s so much more powerful to feel angry and rageful than to touch the vulnerability of what lives behind it.” Between stay-at-home orders, Covid-19 health concerns, financial instability (or fear of it), and police violence against Black people, it is no surprise that mothers are experiencing intensified rage above the surface, and feelings of grief, fear, and loneliness below. “We’re asking all parents, but it’s especially moms on the front lines, to try to do 24/7 child care without a break at the same time that they’re trying to often hold down a job,” said Laura Markham, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, parenting coach and author of “Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids: How to Stop Yelling and Start Connecting.” “So, is there more mom rage?” she asked. “How could there not be?” Mom rage expresses itself in different ways. Anya Persaud, who has a 3-year-old and a newborn and lives in Beacon, N.Y., could pinpoint her fury: “Raising my voice and walking hard are signs I’m heading from frustration to rage.” Virginia Duan, who homeschools her four children, ages 3, 6, 8 and 10, in the San Francisco Bay Area, said: “It feels as if I am going to physically explode, like having an out-of-body experience where I cannot seem to control the litany of invectives flying from my mouth.” Molly Caro May, who lives in Bozeman, Mont., and is the author of “Body Full of Stars: Female Rage and My Passage into Motherhood,” said of her rage, “I never hurt anyone, but I was out in the forest throwing rocks at trees.” Moms aren’t supposed to yell and stomp and throw rocks, and we aren’t supposed to share our rage publicly. I have wondered if I’ve been able to write openly about mom rage without much reproach because it has become so commonplace in our lexicon, or if it is because I am white. Nefertiti Austin, the author of “Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America,” wasn’t familiar with the term “mom rage” but acknowledged that the intense anger is somewhat universal for moms. Of Black mothers, Austin said: “It’s tricky for us, because we are already saddled with ‘angry Black woman.’ I definitely don’t want to be described as having mom rage, because it’s not going to play the same if I say I have it, than if a white mom says she has it.” Austin added that because of racist stereotypes, Black mothers are under more pressure to appear perfect. With police violence against Black people, Austin said, Black mothers may have their “children on a tighter leash than white parents.” “The whole ‘kids will be kids’ thing? We know that that’s not true when it comes to our kids. There isn’t a lot of grace for Black children,” Austin said. That fear and perfectionism can only add fuel to the mom-rage fire. Since viewing the video of George Floyd’s death, Persuad said her mood and sleep have suffered. “I’ve had overwhelming anxiety and feelings of hopelessness and helplessness.” Duan said one of the factors affecting her mom rage is “the trauma of being Asian-American during the pandemic,” after some, including President Trump, have blamed China for the coronavirus outbreak. The attack has led to a surge in xenophobia against Asian-Americans. It’s been a few months since the pandemic began and several weeks since protests against police violence filled our neighborhoods. All the while, mothers continue to work multiple jobs at once (teacher and mom at a minimum), and they’re exhausted. May said she vacillates between “this week, we’re going to study cities of the United States” and “actually, we’re just going to be outside playing with sticks.” Like May, Duan concedes her bandwidth has been lower since Covid-19. “I think it goes hand-in-hand with my resignation,” she said. “I’m fine with the kids just messing around and occasionally learning.” Persaud is having similar throw-up-her-hands moments these days. “Where before I might have raised my voice, now I give in,” she said. She will allow her son to skip a nap or eat with the television on. “Surely, we can’t yell and scream every day, right?” This “laissez faire” parenting style seems more than warranted during this strange, stuck-at-home period. But how can mothers fill up their tanks above empty? Is self-care even possible for mothers during the coronavirus era? May described her self-care during the pandemic as “feast or famine.” “Some weeks, I’m on it,” she said. “I exercise, feed myself beautiful food, get some quiet time, and I feel really good. Other weeks I’m literally eating butter on bread in the corner of my kitchen eight times a day. It can feel like I just need to get my basic needs met and everyone is in the way of that.” When I asked Persaud how she makes time for herself, she answered unequivocally, “Showers!” Whitney Sandoval, who lives in Wichita, Kan., with her 5- and 3-year-olds, will drive to pick up her groceries and then hang out in her car in the parking lot. “I listen to music or a podcast, read or just sit in silence. It’s the closest I can get to being alone.” Eating properly, exercising, showering and getting a little alone time sound like they belong in the “basic health requirements” category as opposed to “self-care for mothers.” Even if those bare minimum self-care needs are met, mom rage doesn’t just disappear. Rage has something to say and, according to Dr. Markham, “Rage doesn’t dissipate until it feels heard.” Ruth King, an educator, life coach, meditation teacher and the author of many books, including “Healing Rage: Women Making Inner Peace Possible” and “Mindful of Race: Transforming Racism from the Inside Out,” said: “Rage sits at the crossroads of personal transformation. Rage is not to be understood as a useless emotion, empty of knowledge. Rather, rage is fierce clarity and untapped fuel ? when we push rage away, we can’t learn from it.” Unfortunately, many mothers are doing just that. It is a challenge to find mothers who will talk on the record for this article. One mom eagerly emailed me about her rage, but then declined being quoted, saying, “You know, mom shame.” Bellenbaum of The Motherhood Center said, “There’s so much guilt that we feel toward ourselves, and a kind of inner-disappointment that we have these types of feelings at this intensity, especially toward our children.” It can be challenging for partners living with those who have mom rage to be able to offer compassion and support, especially during the pandemic, when the emotional bandwidth of all parents is stretched thin. In support groups at The Motherhood Center, Bellenbaum has seen mothers find the nonjudgmental witnesses they need in each other. She said, “When we connect with other women who are having the same feelings, that sense of community creates an initial and immediate relief.” I have experienced this relief myself. What the mothers who write to me about their mom rage don’t know is that their emails help me feel less alone, too. Since the pandemic began, people have been clapping, singing and howling into the night at a certain hour. Some clap to thank essential workers. Others howl in grief or just to relieve stress. Maybe it’s time for mothers to take to the windows and bellow out a collective earsplitting roar. By Minna Dubin, The New York Times July 6, 2020
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    2020-07-24
  • Gyeonggi Resumes Supply of Fruit to Childcare Centers
    1. Gyeonggi Forms Taskforce to Prevent Anti-North Korean Leaflet Launches  Gyeonggi Province has formed a task force to prevent the launch of anti-North Korea leaflet balloons, deeming it to be an act that jeopardizes the lives and safety of local residents. The province also established an emergency network encompassing police offices and border regions as well as southern provincial regions so as to facilitate swift reports of and responses to balloon-launching activities. Potential balloon-launching areas will be closely monitored and those who launch such balloons will be arrested. ?   2. Gyeonggi Designates Summer Heatwave Response Period Gyeonggi Province recently designated the period until September 30 as a “Heatwave Response Period”, during which special response measures will be implemented by the Gyeonggi Disaster and Safety Headquarters. During this period, the province will allocate a total of KRW 12.6 billion for the installation of heat shelters, such as smart tents and parasols, as well as for the planting of shade trees at more than 2,000 locations. To prevent the spread of COVID-19 during this period, indoor heat shelters will remain closed while the use of artificial mist facilities and fountains will be discouraged. Kim Nam-geun, Director, Gyeonggi Province Natural Disaster Division said “We have increased the number of heat shelters from 3,610 to 5,615 this year. We will maintain heat response capabilities through the proactive operation of the heatwave management taskforces and via the Gyeonggi Disaster and Safety Headquarters.” 3. Gyeonggi Uncovers Large Number of Bad Egg Sellers and Users During a recent crackdown in Gyeonggi Province on the distribution and usage of bad eggs, including those with broken shells, a large number of violators were apprehended. The Gyeonggi Province Special Judicial Police announced that among the 424 egg distributors and restaurants it investigated during the period from April 27 to May 8, a total of 68 violations were uncovered at 65 locations. Gyeonggi Province Special Judicial Police Superintendent In-Chi-gwon said “Distributors purchase the (bad) eggs from egg farmers, usually for KRW 400 (per packet). They then sell these eggs to restaurants for KRW 1,000. Compared to their normal purchase prices, which range from KRW 3,500 to 3,800, restaurants save more than KRW 2,000.” 4. Gyeonggi Resumes Supply of Fruit to Childcare Centers After a long COVID19-induced suspension period, Gyeonggi Province resumed the regular supply of fruit to childcare centers from June 15. From last year, the province had been supplying a variety of fruits once or twice weekly to 367,000 children at all childcare centers, local children’s centers and children’s homes in the province. In order to promote healthy dietary habits among children, the province will supply free locally produced fruit to these facilities a total of 43 times this year. GTV
    • English
    • welfare
    2020-07-03
  • ‘10 Questions Parents May Have About Coronavirus’
    Schools across the country have closed in response to the new coronavirus and many parents have questions about how to go about their daily lives while managing their children, whose personal boundaries and hygiene levels are not always ideal. Because the situation is evolving rapidly and the virus is new, the advice may continue to change as we learn more.  “We’re not seeing much in the way of serious illness among children,” said Dr. Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. “And as a result, we’re not really testing children nearly as much, so we don’t even know the role of children in the transmission of this disease.” Dr. Sean O’Leary, M.D., an executive member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Infectious Diseases, said it’s still reasonable for people to err on the side of caution as much as possible right now. “We’re in the midst of something that no one alive has really experienced before,” he said. With that in mind, here are some answers to common questions. Can I still take my child to public places? It depends. The situation is changing by the hour, so your best bet is to regularly check your state and local public health department websites for recommendations, Dr. O’Leary said. But as of now, the general advice is to practice social distancing, Dr. Hotez said, which means sticking close to home and avoiding large groups of people. On March 16, the Trump Administration announced new guidelines to help stop the spread of the new coronavirus, which included closing schools that were still open and avoiding bars, food courts, restaurants and groups of more than 10 people. You can’t be sure that popular public spaces like playgrounds are risk-free — the virus is estimated to survive on metal, glass and plastic surfaces for anywhere from 2 hours to nine days. New York City, for example, does not regularly clean outdoor furniture and play equipment, said Meghan Lalor, director of media relations at the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. “We have not yet committed to changing our standard operations due to coronavirus, but we will continue to monitor the situation as it develops,” she said. On  March 17, all New York City “recreation centers and nature centers are closed to the public until further notice,” Lalor said, though city parks and playgrounds remain open. At this point, some communities are closing their playgrounds; considering school is out and we don’t want children congregating all together,  Dr. O’Leary said playgrounds are “probably not the safest place right now.” For city dwellers, he recommended going to big, wide-open parks when available, where kids can stay six feet apart from each other and not touch equipment. Remember there are other options for solo outdoor play, like riding on a scooter or a bike. There are also options for indoor movement — for example, there are kids’ yoga videos all over YouTube you and your family can enjoy together. As always, encourage hand washing when children come in from outside and before and after meals. Kids should sing “Happy Birthday” twice to know how long to wash their hands, and then make sure they are drying them thoroughly.  There’s some evidence that paper towels are more hygienic than hand dryers in public bathrooms. Hand washing is also more effective than hand sanitizer, though hand sanitizer can be used when hand washing is not an option. Should I cancel my kid’s birthday party? It’s probably safest to err on the side of caution and cancel. “Larger gatherings are becoming increasingly risky,” Dr. O’Leary said. It’s also unclear what you should do about more intimate interactions, like play dates, but Dr. O’Leary said it’s probably OK to hang out with another family you know well — just make sure nobody is showing any symptoms first. Ideally, he said, you’d have them get together outside and keep six feet apart from each other. “You want to find that balance of keeping your kids sane by having interactions and keeping them safe.” (It’s worth noting that there is not consensus among medical experts about whether even group interactions under 10 people are OK. Use your discretion.). The store is out of hand sanitizer. Should I make my own? Recipes for homemade hand sanitizer are circulating online, but none of the experts I spoke to recommended making your own, even if stores have run out. Many popular brands of hand sanitizer, like Purell or Highmark, have established concentrations of alcohol, generally between 60 and 95 percent, said Dr. Rebecca Pellett Madan, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist at N.Y.U. Langone’s Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital, which helps ensure their effectiveness.  Additionally, she said, “we have experience using it in hospitals, and we know how effective it is.” The same evidence base for homemade recipes doesn’t exist yet. If you are using store-bought hand sanitizer, make sure that it’s at least 60 percent alcohol and that it fully dries before you or your child touch anything — otherwise it won’t work as well. Also keep in mind that hand sanitizers are not as effective when used on “visibly dirty or greasy” hands, according to the C.D.C. My child has mild cold or flu symptoms. Should I take him to the hospital? No. Coronavirus symptoms can include fever, dry cough or shortness of breath. If your child has other symptoms, like mild fever, runny nose or sore throat, you should call your pediatrician first before going anywhere. From what we know so far, runny noses — which are a near-constant among preschoolers — are rarely a symptom of infection with the new coronavirus, but sore throats sometimes are. “We want people who are not critically ill to stay out of the hospital,” Dr. Madan said. If your child develops more severe symptoms, such as trouble breathing, an inability to eat or drink or a change in behavior, you should visit a doctor, Dr. Madan said. If my child is very sick, will she be able to get tested? Unless your child has a history of direct contact with someone who has tested positive for the virus, a history of travel to affected areas or is sick enough to be hospitalized, it is unlikely she will be tested. “Availability of testing depends on where you are,” Dr. O’Leary said. “Even in the best case scenario, you can’t test everyone because there aren’t enough test kits at this point.” Older and higher-risk patients are being prioritized for testing because they tend to develop the most severe symptoms after infection. If your child does get tested, it’s unclear how quickly her results will come back — and the time frame will most likely depend on where you are, which lab is testing her and how long she’s been sick. “It’s all over the map,” Dr. O’Leary said. Anecdotally, he has heard about results taking anywhere from a few hours to seven days, depending on the state and the level of demand. A greater number of labs will be able to provide testing in the coming days, according to Dr. O’Leary. But because there may also be increased demand, it’s unclear whether that will speed up testing time overall. Is it safe to take my child on public transportation? It is not recommended. New York City has urged commuters of all ages to avoid getting on packed subway cars and to walk or bike to work, if possible. On Thursday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he had no plans to shut down the subway. What if my child has a compromised immune system? Because there isn’t much information yet about how children react to this virus, it’s tough to say if there are any additional measures folks should take beyond the isolation already recommended for the general population, Dr. Hotez said. But Dr. Madan said that parents of children who have compromised immune systems should be taking it “day by day.” If your child has asthma, available evidence suggests they are not at increased risk for the virus, but that may change as we learn more. Should my family be taking any extra hygienic measures beyond hand washing? You can wash bedsheets and towels more often. Jolie Kerr, a cleaning expert and frequent New York Times contributor, said that you could also wash stuffed animals more often (here’s how) and clean hard toys with antibacterial wipes regularly — particularly after outdoor use. Should Grandma still come visit? Older adults, especially those who have compromised immune systems, should not travel on planes right now, Dr. O’Leary said, since they seem to be the most vulnerable to the new coronavirus. Some areas are calling for more extreme measures: For example, California called for people over 65 to stay in their homes. For more general guidance on whether you should cancel your family’s travel, read our piece on vacation planning. The State Department is currently warning Americans not to travel on cruise ships and is asking people to reconsider traveling abroad. By Jessica Grose, The New York Times  
    • English
    2020-04-08
  • The overview of support for multicultural families in Korea
    1. What is a multicultural family? A multicultural family refers to any of the following families (Article 2, subparagraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). A family comprised of immigrants by marriage and persons who have acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea. A family comprised of a person who has acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea and a person who has acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea pursuant to the “Nationality Act”. -The provisions to support multicultural families under the “Multicultural Families Support Act” also applies to multicultural family members who raise children born in de facto marital relationships with a citizen of the Republic of Korea (Article 14 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 2. Immigrants by marriage Immigrants by marriage means any foreign resident in Korea (those who do not possess the nationality of the Republic of Korea and who legally stay in Korea for the purpose of residing in Korea) who had or has a marital relationship with a Korean national (Article 2, subparagraphs 3 and 1 of the “Framework Act On Treatment Of Foreigners Residing In The Republic Of Korea”). Immigrants by marriage, etc. means persons who obtained permission for naturalization as members of a multicultural family (Article 2, subparagraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 3. Master plan for multicultural family support The Minister of Gender Equality and Family must establish a master plan for policies on multicultural families every five years to support multicultural families following prior consultation with the heads of the relevant central administrative agencies (Article 3-2, paragraphs 1, 2, and 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”): ▲Basic direction-setting for support policies for multicultural families ▲Matters concerning development measures in each field for supporting multicultural families and evaluation thereof ▲Matters concerning improvement of support systems for multicultural families ▲Matters concerning promotion of multicultural family members’ activities in all areas including economy, society, and culture ▲Matters concerning financial resources for supporting multicultural families and distribution thereof ▲Other matters necessary for supporting multicultural families 4. Provision of Daily Life Information and Educational Support Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive basic information necessary for living in the Republic of Korea (including information related to learning and guidance for children and juveniles), and education for social adaptation, vocational education and training, as well as Korean language education to enhance their communication skills (Article 6, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”).  Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive basic information necessary to understand the countries and cultures of the immigrants by marriage, etc. and receive support for related education (Article 6, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). In the process of the above education, the members of multicultural families may receive education in various ways, such as through visiting education and distance education, to ensure that all immigrants by marriage, etc. and their spouses and family members have access to educational services regardless of their places of residence and home environment, etc. (Article 6, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). -The costs of the above visiting education may be covered by differentiated subsidies in accordance with standards determined and publicly notified by the Minister of Gender Equality and Family, such as household income levels of immigrants by marriage, etc. and types of education (Article 6, paragraph 4 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 5. Protection of and Support for Victims of Domestic Violence The state and local governments must endeavor to prevent domestic violence in multicultural families in accordance with the Act on the Prevention of Domestic Violence and Protection, etc. of Victims (Article 8, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments are able to protect and support immigrants by marriage, etc. who are victims of domestic violence (Article 8, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments must endeavor to establish more counseling centers and protection facilities for victims of domestic violence which provide foreign language interpretation services to protect and support immigrants by marriage, etc. who are victims of domestic violence (Article 8, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). In the event that immigrants by marriage, etc. terminate a marital relationship due to domestic violence, the state and local governments may provide necessary services to them, such as language interpretation, legal counseling, and administrative assistance in making statements and finding facts, so that they will not be placed at a disadvantage due to communication difficulties and/or lack of information about the legal system and other relevant matters (Article 8, paragraph 4 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 6. Medical and Health Support Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive medical services, such as education on nutrition and health, prenatal and postpartum care, and medical examinations, to ensure their healthy living (Article 9, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments are able to provide immigrants by marriage, etc. interpretation services when they receive the medical services provided above (Article 9, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 7. Care and Education for Children and Juveniles The state and local governments must not discriminate against children or juveniles of any multicultural family in providing care and education services for children and juveniles (Article 10, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments set measures in place for educational assistance to children and juveniles of multicultural families to help them to quickly adapt to school life, and children and juveniles of multicultural families are entitled to receive support for extracurricular or after-school education programs (Article 10, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). -Children and juveniles means persons of age 24 years or younger (Article 2, subparagraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). Members of multicultural families under 18 years of age are entitled to receive support for preschool care and education services to develop language skills as well as the assistance necessary for improving their linguistic proficiency, such as learning materials and teaching support in learning of Korean language and the mother tongue of their father or mother who is an immigrant by marriage (Article 10, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 8. Provision of Multilingual Services Multilingual services may be received to remove communication barriers facing immigrants by marriage, etc. and to improve accessibility to services provided in relation to the support policies for multicultural families (Article 11 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 9. Support to promote the welfare of multicultural families in farming and fishing communities The state and local governments must provide full support to multicultural families living in farming and fishing communities to promote their welfare and help them lead stable family lives (Article 18-2 of the “Special Act for the Enhancement of Quality of Life of Farmers and Fishermen and the Promotion of Regional Development of Agriculture and Fishing Village Area”). 10. Enhancement of understanding regarding cultural diversity The State and local governments must endeavor to take measures such as for education, publicity, and correction of unreasonable institutions, etc. to ensure that Koreans and foreign residents in Korea understand and respect each other's history, culture, and institutions (Article 18 of the “Framework Act on Treatment of Foreigners Residing in the Republic of Korea”). 11. Support with proceeds from lottery ticket sales, etc. A part of the proceeds from lottery ticket sales and the lottery fund must be used for projects to support multicultural families (Article 23, paragraph 3, subparagraph 3 of the “Lottery Ticket and Lottery Fund Act”). -The web portal for multicultural families, Danuri (http://www.liveinkorea.kr), is managed under the support of the lottery fund to offer information on living in Korea and the Multicultural Family Support Center as well as counseling in foreign languages.by the ministry of government legistration  
    • English
    2020-03-18
  • Enrollment and transfer guide : For children who came to Korea after living abroad
         
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    2020-03-18
  • Some special stories about COVID-19 outbreak in Korea
    WHO commends Korea's response to COVID-19 outbreak By Oh Hyun-woo and Kim Minji The World Health Organization (WHO) has lauded Korea's response to the COVID-19 outbreak, while warning that the threat of a pandemic "has become very real."  WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on March 9 told a news conference at his organization's headquarters in Geneva that COVID-19 will be the first pandemic in history "that could be controlled."  He added that Korea and Singapore are models demonstrating effective measures to contain the outbreak like closing schools and canceling mass gatherings. "The Republic of Korea has increased efforts to identify all cases and contacts, including drive-through temperature testing to widen the net and catch cases that might otherwise be missed," he said. "Of the four countries with the most cases, China is bringing its epidemic under control and there is now a decline in new cases being reported from the Republic of Korea. Both these countries demonstrate that it's never too late to turn back the tide on this virus." "The rule of the game is never give up," he said, adding, "We continue to call on all countries to take early and aggressive action to protect their people and save lives." Gov't reports success in slowing COVID-19 outbreakBy Kim Young Deok and Kim Minji "We are seeing success in our efforts to stem the spread of COVID-19. Korea is creating a new system to respond to the infectious disease." So said Vice Health and Welfare Minister Kim Gang-lip, who is also deputy director of the Central Epidemic Control Countermeasure Headquarters under the Korean Centers for Disease Control, on March 9 at a joint government briefing with 44 foreign media outlets attending on the nation's response to COVID-19 at the Foreign Press Center in Seoul. The official said the government's new response system provides information transparently and rapidly, makes full use of advanced information technology, conducts diagnostic testing faster than any other country, and has highly trained and outstanding medical professionals and top-notch medical institutions. "The travel histories of confirmed patients are being made public and briefings are being conducted twice a day," he said, citing 50 drive-through screening clinics where a medical examination, heat detection and sample extraction take just ten minutes while people remain seated in their vehicles. He added that Korea is capable of processing up to 15,000 diagnostic tests a day. "The world now faces a common threat, COVID-19. Close collaboration through solidarity will enable us to defeat our common enemy," he said, adding, “Korea, as a member of the global community, will share its experience and knowledge with the rest of the world." At a Q&A session, health officials evaluated the government's preemptive measures for successful prevention of the disease. "Cooperation with civic groups was led by the government," said Kim Yeon-jae, an infectious disease specialist at the Center for Infectious Disease of the National Medical Center, adding, "We saw the participation of a large number of medical experts, and were able to jointly evaluate with the private group, quickly assess the diagnosis kits and distribute them fast." Start of school year delayed By Park Hye Ri and Lee Jihae The start of the academic year for preschools and elementary, middle and high schools will be further delayed to March 23 amid the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Education Yoo Eun-hae on March 2 at Government Complex-Seoul announced the government's policy toward educational management and support in response to COVID-19. To protect students against the outbreak, schools nationwide will postpone the beginning of the academic year for two more weeks to March 23. "The two weeks are crucial to curb the spread of COVID-19. We need at least one more week to evaluate whether the environment is safe enough for students to carry out their scholastic activities," she said. The ministry also announced measures to supplement education for students and make up for the delay in the start of the academic year. To compensate for time lost during school closures, the public education offices of cities and provinces will cooperate with schools to provide in this month's first week free digital textbooks and online educational content. From the second week, they will open academic platforms in online scholastic communities and social media to give out assignments and scholastic feedback. The ministry will carry out additional surveys on preschool and elementary school students who urgently need babysitters. To enable parents to care for their own children, relevant government branches such as the Ministry of Employment and Labor and the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family are boosting cooperation to actively support flexible work hours and time off. The Ministry of Education also advised universities to offer online classes to students in lieu of regular classes. Colleges nationwide will hold online courses and receive government support for scholastic management for the first semester of the year.
    • English
    2020-03-17

실시간 English 기사

  • 경기도외국인인권지원센터 제작, 코로나19 예방수칙(영어)
          ‘이주민이 참여하는 코로나 19 예방’ 동영상 ▷30초 이상 손씻기, 기침 예절 지키기 ▷일상생활 속 거리두기 ▷대중교통 이용 시 마스크 착용하기 ▷주기적으로 환기하기 ▷아프면 3~4일 집에서 쉬기 ▷보건소 안내  
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    • 행사
    • English
    2020-08-26
  • For 2weeks (8.16~) in Seoul·Gyeonggi Province Social-distancing level 2 upgrade
    • 한국어
    • 행사
    • English
    2020-08-26
  • ‘I Am Going to Physically Explode’: Mom Rage in a Pandemic
    After I wrote a personal essay on mom rage in 2019, strangers on Twitter declared me an unfit mother. But I expected Twitter-hate. What I did not expect were the many emails I received from mothers around the world, saying they too struggle with mom rage and my story made them feel less alone. After the initial flood of emails, a trickle continued over the next six months. Then Covid-19 happened, and with it, stay-at-home orders. My inbox began lighting up again, illuminating a direct correlation between mom rage and sheltering in place. “Mom rage” is the colloquial term for the unrestrained anger many women experience during pregnancy, postpartum and beyond. It is a popular topic these days in a support group for working moms at The Motherhood Center, a clinical treatment facility in Manhattan that offers services for pregnant and postpartum women. Paige Bellenbaum, a group facilitator and the center’s founding director, said, “Mom rage is something we talk about all the time. Social isolation, lack of support, managing high levels of anxiety and stress-this is the new normal of being a mother, and during the pandemic in particular.” Anger and rage are waving red flags hinting at feelings below the surface. Mothers who experience rage may be feeling alone, unheard, and unsupported, Bellenbaum said. “But it’s so much more powerful to feel angry and rageful than to touch the vulnerability of what lives behind it.” Between stay-at-home orders, Covid-19 health concerns, financial instability (or fear of it), and police violence against Black people, it is no surprise that mothers are experiencing intensified rage above the surface, and feelings of grief, fear, and loneliness below. “We’re asking all parents, but it’s especially moms on the front lines, to try to do 24/7 child care without a break at the same time that they’re trying to often hold down a job,” said Laura Markham, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, parenting coach and author of “Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids: How to Stop Yelling and Start Connecting.” “So, is there more mom rage?” she asked. “How could there not be?” Mom rage expresses itself in different ways. Anya Persaud, who has a 3-year-old and a newborn and lives in Beacon, N.Y., could pinpoint her fury: “Raising my voice and walking hard are signs I’m heading from frustration to rage.” Virginia Duan, who homeschools her four children, ages 3, 6, 8 and 10, in the San Francisco Bay Area, said: “It feels as if I am going to physically explode, like having an out-of-body experience where I cannot seem to control the litany of invectives flying from my mouth.” Molly Caro May, who lives in Bozeman, Mont., and is the author of “Body Full of Stars: Female Rage and My Passage into Motherhood,” said of her rage, “I never hurt anyone, but I was out in the forest throwing rocks at trees.” Moms aren’t supposed to yell and stomp and throw rocks, and we aren’t supposed to share our rage publicly. I have wondered if I’ve been able to write openly about mom rage without much reproach because it has become so commonplace in our lexicon, or if it is because I am white. Nefertiti Austin, the author of “Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America,” wasn’t familiar with the term “mom rage” but acknowledged that the intense anger is somewhat universal for moms. Of Black mothers, Austin said: “It’s tricky for us, because we are already saddled with ‘angry Black woman.’ I definitely don’t want to be described as having mom rage, because it’s not going to play the same if I say I have it, than if a white mom says she has it.” Austin added that because of racist stereotypes, Black mothers are under more pressure to appear perfect. With police violence against Black people, Austin said, Black mothers may have their “children on a tighter leash than white parents.” “The whole ‘kids will be kids’ thing? We know that that’s not true when it comes to our kids. There isn’t a lot of grace for Black children,” Austin said. That fear and perfectionism can only add fuel to the mom-rage fire. Since viewing the video of George Floyd’s death, Persuad said her mood and sleep have suffered. “I’ve had overwhelming anxiety and feelings of hopelessness and helplessness.” Duan said one of the factors affecting her mom rage is “the trauma of being Asian-American during the pandemic,” after some, including President Trump, have blamed China for the coronavirus outbreak. The attack has led to a surge in xenophobia against Asian-Americans. It’s been a few months since the pandemic began and several weeks since protests against police violence filled our neighborhoods. All the while, mothers continue to work multiple jobs at once (teacher and mom at a minimum), and they’re exhausted. May said she vacillates between “this week, we’re going to study cities of the United States” and “actually, we’re just going to be outside playing with sticks.” Like May, Duan concedes her bandwidth has been lower since Covid-19. “I think it goes hand-in-hand with my resignation,” she said. “I’m fine with the kids just messing around and occasionally learning.” Persaud is having similar throw-up-her-hands moments these days. “Where before I might have raised my voice, now I give in,” she said. She will allow her son to skip a nap or eat with the television on. “Surely, we can’t yell and scream every day, right?” This “laissez faire” parenting style seems more than warranted during this strange, stuck-at-home period. But how can mothers fill up their tanks above empty? Is self-care even possible for mothers during the coronavirus era? May described her self-care during the pandemic as “feast or famine.” “Some weeks, I’m on it,” she said. “I exercise, feed myself beautiful food, get some quiet time, and I feel really good. Other weeks I’m literally eating butter on bread in the corner of my kitchen eight times a day. It can feel like I just need to get my basic needs met and everyone is in the way of that.” When I asked Persaud how she makes time for herself, she answered unequivocally, “Showers!” Whitney Sandoval, who lives in Wichita, Kan., with her 5- and 3-year-olds, will drive to pick up her groceries and then hang out in her car in the parking lot. “I listen to music or a podcast, read or just sit in silence. It’s the closest I can get to being alone.” Eating properly, exercising, showering and getting a little alone time sound like they belong in the “basic health requirements” category as opposed to “self-care for mothers.” Even if those bare minimum self-care needs are met, mom rage doesn’t just disappear. Rage has something to say and, according to Dr. Markham, “Rage doesn’t dissipate until it feels heard.” Ruth King, an educator, life coach, meditation teacher and the author of many books, including “Healing Rage: Women Making Inner Peace Possible” and “Mindful of Race: Transforming Racism from the Inside Out,” said: “Rage sits at the crossroads of personal transformation. Rage is not to be understood as a useless emotion, empty of knowledge. Rather, rage is fierce clarity and untapped fuel ? when we push rage away, we can’t learn from it.” Unfortunately, many mothers are doing just that. It is a challenge to find mothers who will talk on the record for this article. One mom eagerly emailed me about her rage, but then declined being quoted, saying, “You know, mom shame.” Bellenbaum of The Motherhood Center said, “There’s so much guilt that we feel toward ourselves, and a kind of inner-disappointment that we have these types of feelings at this intensity, especially toward our children.” It can be challenging for partners living with those who have mom rage to be able to offer compassion and support, especially during the pandemic, when the emotional bandwidth of all parents is stretched thin. In support groups at The Motherhood Center, Bellenbaum has seen mothers find the nonjudgmental witnesses they need in each other. She said, “When we connect with other women who are having the same feelings, that sense of community creates an initial and immediate relief.” I have experienced this relief myself. What the mothers who write to me about their mom rage don’t know is that their emails help me feel less alone, too. Since the pandemic began, people have been clapping, singing and howling into the night at a certain hour. Some clap to thank essential workers. Others howl in grief or just to relieve stress. Maybe it’s time for mothers to take to the windows and bellow out a collective earsplitting roar. By Minna Dubin, The New York Times July 6, 2020
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    • 행사
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    2020-07-24
  • Gyeonggi Resumes Supply of Fruit to Childcare Centers
    1. Gyeonggi Forms Taskforce to Prevent Anti-North Korean Leaflet Launches  Gyeonggi Province has formed a task force to prevent the launch of anti-North Korea leaflet balloons, deeming it to be an act that jeopardizes the lives and safety of local residents. The province also established an emergency network encompassing police offices and border regions as well as southern provincial regions so as to facilitate swift reports of and responses to balloon-launching activities. Potential balloon-launching areas will be closely monitored and those who launch such balloons will be arrested. ?   2. Gyeonggi Designates Summer Heatwave Response Period Gyeonggi Province recently designated the period until September 30 as a “Heatwave Response Period”, during which special response measures will be implemented by the Gyeonggi Disaster and Safety Headquarters. During this period, the province will allocate a total of KRW 12.6 billion for the installation of heat shelters, such as smart tents and parasols, as well as for the planting of shade trees at more than 2,000 locations. To prevent the spread of COVID-19 during this period, indoor heat shelters will remain closed while the use of artificial mist facilities and fountains will be discouraged. Kim Nam-geun, Director, Gyeonggi Province Natural Disaster Division said “We have increased the number of heat shelters from 3,610 to 5,615 this year. We will maintain heat response capabilities through the proactive operation of the heatwave management taskforces and via the Gyeonggi Disaster and Safety Headquarters.” 3. Gyeonggi Uncovers Large Number of Bad Egg Sellers and Users During a recent crackdown in Gyeonggi Province on the distribution and usage of bad eggs, including those with broken shells, a large number of violators were apprehended. The Gyeonggi Province Special Judicial Police announced that among the 424 egg distributors and restaurants it investigated during the period from April 27 to May 8, a total of 68 violations were uncovered at 65 locations. Gyeonggi Province Special Judicial Police Superintendent In-Chi-gwon said “Distributors purchase the (bad) eggs from egg farmers, usually for KRW 400 (per packet). They then sell these eggs to restaurants for KRW 1,000. Compared to their normal purchase prices, which range from KRW 3,500 to 3,800, restaurants save more than KRW 2,000.” 4. Gyeonggi Resumes Supply of Fruit to Childcare Centers After a long COVID19-induced suspension period, Gyeonggi Province resumed the regular supply of fruit to childcare centers from June 15. From last year, the province had been supplying a variety of fruits once or twice weekly to 367,000 children at all childcare centers, local children’s centers and children’s homes in the province. In order to promote healthy dietary habits among children, the province will supply free locally produced fruit to these facilities a total of 43 times this year. GTV
    • English
    • welfare
    2020-07-03
  • Preventing Sexual Harassment on the Job
         
    • 한국어
    • 행사
    • English
    2020-04-27
  • Enrolling Your Child in School
         
    • English
    • children\'s education
    2020-04-27
  • 5 Key Daily Quarantine Rules for individuals to practice in daily lives (April 13, 2020)
    We would like to inform the 5 rules to keep during ‘Daily Quarantine’ in continuing daily activities to a certain extent while preventing infection and spread of the virus.  5 Key Daily Quarantine Rules (Rule 1) Rest at home for 3-4 days if any symptoms detected. Reason: COVID-19 is easily spread even during the early stage with mild symptoms. You can reduce the possibility of COVID-19 spreading just by reducing contact with others. 1. If you have respiratory symptoms, stay home and rest for 3~4 days.  Respiratory symptoms: Fever, cough, phlegm, sore muscle pain, stuffy nose, etc. 2. If you detect any symptoms, refrain from meeting others, keep your mask on at home if you live with other people. (Refrain contact with elderly and underlying patients such as talking and eating together) 3. Return to your daily routine if the symptoms disappear after resting. If a fever over 38℃ lasts or symptoms get worse during the rest, call (☎1399, ☎ Area code+120) or contact the medical center. 4. Put on mask during essential outings such as visiting doctors, pharmacy, or grocery shopping, etc. 5. Companies, business owners, etc. should cooperate so that the employees with symptoms do not go to work, and allow them to return home and rest. (Rule 2) Keep enough space between people at intervals of double arms  Reason: COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets of saliva. Keeping more than 2 meters space between people can reduce the possibility of exposure to saliva when talking, coughing or sneezing, which leads to reducing the risk of infection. 1. Do not go to enclosed or crowded places as much as possible. 2. Keep approximately 2 meters away (at least 1 meter) from others in daily lives. 3. Place seats so that people can keep enough distance from others. 4. When many people need to gather, provide enough space so that people can keep 2 meters distance between others or adjust the time. 5. Do not shake hands or hug. (Rule 3) Wash hands thoroughly & cover your cough with your sleeve Reason: Prevents viruses from entering our body through our contaminated hands and droplets of saliva from spreading by following the cough etiquette. 1. Wash hands in running water and soap for more than 30 seconds or hand sanitizer before and after meals, after using the toilet, returning to home from outside, blowing nose, coughing or sneezing. 2. Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth before washing your hands. 3. Prepare a sink and soap in private/public space and place hand sanitizers in various areas.- Wash your hands once every two hours. 4. Cover your cough or sneeze with tissue, handkerchief or inner part of your sleeve. 5. If you have respiratory symptoms such as fever, cough, phlegm, muscle pain, stuffy nose, etc. or feel unwell, put on mask for others. (Rule 4) Ventilate two times or more a day and disinfect regularly.  Reason: Reducing the concentration of virus-containing saliva droplets that may be in the air by ventilation and disinfecting areas that may have droplets of saliva can reduce infection of COVID-19 through hands. 1. Keep the windows open if natural ventilation is possible. If this is not possible due to PM 2.5 or other reasons, ventilate at least two times a day for more than 15 minutes each time. - Open both doors and windows at the same time during ventilation. 2. Keep your everyday space such as your home or workspace etc. clean and disinfect where people’s hands are often reached more than once a week. - Phone, remote controller, handle, doorknob, desk, armrest, switch, keyboard, mouse, copy machine, etc. 3. Disinfect public places and items every day where many people come by and frequently touch.-Places touched frequently: Elevator button, entrance door, handle, rail, doorknob, armrest, switch, etc.Public items: Shopping carts etc. 4. When disinfecting, follow the instructions (usage, directions, etc.) from the manufacture of the supplies.- Disinfection supplies: Disinfecting wipes, alcohol (ethanol 70%), sodium hypochlorite (household Clorox, etc.) (Rule 5) Keep Distance, Stay Together  Reason: COVID-19 can be overcome with everyone’s cooperation and effort. We need to create a society that cares, comforts and works together. 1. Keep in touch with our nearest and dearest even though you do not meet them in person. 2. Think of sharing and solidarity for the community. Oppose to discrimination and stigma towards COVID-19 patients, quarantined persons, and etc. 3. Sharing and practicing care for the vulnerable social group. 4. Check sources of suspicious information, no sharing inaccurate rumors, and avoid excessive immersion in media.  
    • 한국어
    • 행사
    • English
    2020-04-17
  • ‘10 Questions Parents May Have About Coronavirus’
    Schools across the country have closed in response to the new coronavirus and many parents have questions about how to go about their daily lives while managing their children, whose personal boundaries and hygiene levels are not always ideal. Because the situation is evolving rapidly and the virus is new, the advice may continue to change as we learn more.  “We’re not seeing much in the way of serious illness among children,” said Dr. Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. “And as a result, we’re not really testing children nearly as much, so we don’t even know the role of children in the transmission of this disease.” Dr. Sean O’Leary, M.D., an executive member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Infectious Diseases, said it’s still reasonable for people to err on the side of caution as much as possible right now. “We’re in the midst of something that no one alive has really experienced before,” he said. With that in mind, here are some answers to common questions. Can I still take my child to public places? It depends. The situation is changing by the hour, so your best bet is to regularly check your state and local public health department websites for recommendations, Dr. O’Leary said. But as of now, the general advice is to practice social distancing, Dr. Hotez said, which means sticking close to home and avoiding large groups of people. On March 16, the Trump Administration announced new guidelines to help stop the spread of the new coronavirus, which included closing schools that were still open and avoiding bars, food courts, restaurants and groups of more than 10 people. You can’t be sure that popular public spaces like playgrounds are risk-free — the virus is estimated to survive on metal, glass and plastic surfaces for anywhere from 2 hours to nine days. New York City, for example, does not regularly clean outdoor furniture and play equipment, said Meghan Lalor, director of media relations at the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. “We have not yet committed to changing our standard operations due to coronavirus, but we will continue to monitor the situation as it develops,” she said. On  March 17, all New York City “recreation centers and nature centers are closed to the public until further notice,” Lalor said, though city parks and playgrounds remain open. At this point, some communities are closing their playgrounds; considering school is out and we don’t want children congregating all together,  Dr. O’Leary said playgrounds are “probably not the safest place right now.” For city dwellers, he recommended going to big, wide-open parks when available, where kids can stay six feet apart from each other and not touch equipment. Remember there are other options for solo outdoor play, like riding on a scooter or a bike. There are also options for indoor movement — for example, there are kids’ yoga videos all over YouTube you and your family can enjoy together. As always, encourage hand washing when children come in from outside and before and after meals. Kids should sing “Happy Birthday” twice to know how long to wash their hands, and then make sure they are drying them thoroughly.  There’s some evidence that paper towels are more hygienic than hand dryers in public bathrooms. Hand washing is also more effective than hand sanitizer, though hand sanitizer can be used when hand washing is not an option. Should I cancel my kid’s birthday party? It’s probably safest to err on the side of caution and cancel. “Larger gatherings are becoming increasingly risky,” Dr. O’Leary said. It’s also unclear what you should do about more intimate interactions, like play dates, but Dr. O’Leary said it’s probably OK to hang out with another family you know well — just make sure nobody is showing any symptoms first. Ideally, he said, you’d have them get together outside and keep six feet apart from each other. “You want to find that balance of keeping your kids sane by having interactions and keeping them safe.” (It’s worth noting that there is not consensus among medical experts about whether even group interactions under 10 people are OK. Use your discretion.). The store is out of hand sanitizer. Should I make my own? Recipes for homemade hand sanitizer are circulating online, but none of the experts I spoke to recommended making your own, even if stores have run out. Many popular brands of hand sanitizer, like Purell or Highmark, have established concentrations of alcohol, generally between 60 and 95 percent, said Dr. Rebecca Pellett Madan, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist at N.Y.U. Langone’s Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital, which helps ensure their effectiveness.  Additionally, she said, “we have experience using it in hospitals, and we know how effective it is.” The same evidence base for homemade recipes doesn’t exist yet. If you are using store-bought hand sanitizer, make sure that it’s at least 60 percent alcohol and that it fully dries before you or your child touch anything — otherwise it won’t work as well. Also keep in mind that hand sanitizers are not as effective when used on “visibly dirty or greasy” hands, according to the C.D.C. My child has mild cold or flu symptoms. Should I take him to the hospital? No. Coronavirus symptoms can include fever, dry cough or shortness of breath. If your child has other symptoms, like mild fever, runny nose or sore throat, you should call your pediatrician first before going anywhere. From what we know so far, runny noses — which are a near-constant among preschoolers — are rarely a symptom of infection with the new coronavirus, but sore throats sometimes are. “We want people who are not critically ill to stay out of the hospital,” Dr. Madan said. If your child develops more severe symptoms, such as trouble breathing, an inability to eat or drink or a change in behavior, you should visit a doctor, Dr. Madan said. If my child is very sick, will she be able to get tested? Unless your child has a history of direct contact with someone who has tested positive for the virus, a history of travel to affected areas or is sick enough to be hospitalized, it is unlikely she will be tested. “Availability of testing depends on where you are,” Dr. O’Leary said. “Even in the best case scenario, you can’t test everyone because there aren’t enough test kits at this point.” Older and higher-risk patients are being prioritized for testing because they tend to develop the most severe symptoms after infection. If your child does get tested, it’s unclear how quickly her results will come back — and the time frame will most likely depend on where you are, which lab is testing her and how long she’s been sick. “It’s all over the map,” Dr. O’Leary said. Anecdotally, he has heard about results taking anywhere from a few hours to seven days, depending on the state and the level of demand. A greater number of labs will be able to provide testing in the coming days, according to Dr. O’Leary. But because there may also be increased demand, it’s unclear whether that will speed up testing time overall. Is it safe to take my child on public transportation? It is not recommended. New York City has urged commuters of all ages to avoid getting on packed subway cars and to walk or bike to work, if possible. On Thursday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he had no plans to shut down the subway. What if my child has a compromised immune system? Because there isn’t much information yet about how children react to this virus, it’s tough to say if there are any additional measures folks should take beyond the isolation already recommended for the general population, Dr. Hotez said. But Dr. Madan said that parents of children who have compromised immune systems should be taking it “day by day.” If your child has asthma, available evidence suggests they are not at increased risk for the virus, but that may change as we learn more. Should my family be taking any extra hygienic measures beyond hand washing? You can wash bedsheets and towels more often. Jolie Kerr, a cleaning expert and frequent New York Times contributor, said that you could also wash stuffed animals more often (here’s how) and clean hard toys with antibacterial wipes regularly — particularly after outdoor use. Should Grandma still come visit? Older adults, especially those who have compromised immune systems, should not travel on planes right now, Dr. O’Leary said, since they seem to be the most vulnerable to the new coronavirus. Some areas are calling for more extreme measures: For example, California called for people over 65 to stay in their homes. For more general guidance on whether you should cancel your family’s travel, read our piece on vacation planning. The State Department is currently warning Americans not to travel on cruise ships and is asking people to reconsider traveling abroad. By Jessica Grose, The New York Times  
    • English
    2020-04-08
  • The overview of support for multicultural families in Korea
    1. What is a multicultural family? A multicultural family refers to any of the following families (Article 2, subparagraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). A family comprised of immigrants by marriage and persons who have acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea. A family comprised of a person who has acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea and a person who has acquired nationality of the Republic of Korea pursuant to the “Nationality Act”. -The provisions to support multicultural families under the “Multicultural Families Support Act” also applies to multicultural family members who raise children born in de facto marital relationships with a citizen of the Republic of Korea (Article 14 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 2. Immigrants by marriage Immigrants by marriage means any foreign resident in Korea (those who do not possess the nationality of the Republic of Korea and who legally stay in Korea for the purpose of residing in Korea) who had or has a marital relationship with a Korean national (Article 2, subparagraphs 3 and 1 of the “Framework Act On Treatment Of Foreigners Residing In The Republic Of Korea”). Immigrants by marriage, etc. means persons who obtained permission for naturalization as members of a multicultural family (Article 2, subparagraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 3. Master plan for multicultural family support The Minister of Gender Equality and Family must establish a master plan for policies on multicultural families every five years to support multicultural families following prior consultation with the heads of the relevant central administrative agencies (Article 3-2, paragraphs 1, 2, and 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”): ▲Basic direction-setting for support policies for multicultural families ▲Matters concerning development measures in each field for supporting multicultural families and evaluation thereof ▲Matters concerning improvement of support systems for multicultural families ▲Matters concerning promotion of multicultural family members’ activities in all areas including economy, society, and culture ▲Matters concerning financial resources for supporting multicultural families and distribution thereof ▲Other matters necessary for supporting multicultural families 4. Provision of Daily Life Information and Educational Support Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive basic information necessary for living in the Republic of Korea (including information related to learning and guidance for children and juveniles), and education for social adaptation, vocational education and training, as well as Korean language education to enhance their communication skills (Article 6, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”).  Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive basic information necessary to understand the countries and cultures of the immigrants by marriage, etc. and receive support for related education (Article 6, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). In the process of the above education, the members of multicultural families may receive education in various ways, such as through visiting education and distance education, to ensure that all immigrants by marriage, etc. and their spouses and family members have access to educational services regardless of their places of residence and home environment, etc. (Article 6, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). -The costs of the above visiting education may be covered by differentiated subsidies in accordance with standards determined and publicly notified by the Minister of Gender Equality and Family, such as household income levels of immigrants by marriage, etc. and types of education (Article 6, paragraph 4 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 5. Protection of and Support for Victims of Domestic Violence The state and local governments must endeavor to prevent domestic violence in multicultural families in accordance with the Act on the Prevention of Domestic Violence and Protection, etc. of Victims (Article 8, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments are able to protect and support immigrants by marriage, etc. who are victims of domestic violence (Article 8, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments must endeavor to establish more counseling centers and protection facilities for victims of domestic violence which provide foreign language interpretation services to protect and support immigrants by marriage, etc. who are victims of domestic violence (Article 8, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). In the event that immigrants by marriage, etc. terminate a marital relationship due to domestic violence, the state and local governments may provide necessary services to them, such as language interpretation, legal counseling, and administrative assistance in making statements and finding facts, so that they will not be placed at a disadvantage due to communication difficulties and/or lack of information about the legal system and other relevant matters (Article 8, paragraph 4 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 6. Medical and Health Support Members of multicultural families are entitled to receive medical services, such as education on nutrition and health, prenatal and postpartum care, and medical examinations, to ensure their healthy living (Article 9, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments are able to provide immigrants by marriage, etc. interpretation services when they receive the medical services provided above (Article 9, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 7. Care and Education for Children and Juveniles The state and local governments must not discriminate against children or juveniles of any multicultural family in providing care and education services for children and juveniles (Article 10, paragraph 1 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). The state and local governments set measures in place for educational assistance to children and juveniles of multicultural families to help them to quickly adapt to school life, and children and juveniles of multicultural families are entitled to receive support for extracurricular or after-school education programs (Article 10, paragraph 2 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). -Children and juveniles means persons of age 24 years or younger (Article 2, subparagraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). Members of multicultural families under 18 years of age are entitled to receive support for preschool care and education services to develop language skills as well as the assistance necessary for improving their linguistic proficiency, such as learning materials and teaching support in learning of Korean language and the mother tongue of their father or mother who is an immigrant by marriage (Article 10, paragraph 3 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 8. Provision of Multilingual Services Multilingual services may be received to remove communication barriers facing immigrants by marriage, etc. and to improve accessibility to services provided in relation to the support policies for multicultural families (Article 11 of the “Multicultural Families Support Act”). 9. Support to promote the welfare of multicultural families in farming and fishing communities The state and local governments must provide full support to multicultural families living in farming and fishing communities to promote their welfare and help them lead stable family lives (Article 18-2 of the “Special Act for the Enhancement of Quality of Life of Farmers and Fishermen and the Promotion of Regional Development of Agriculture and Fishing Village Area”). 10. Enhancement of understanding regarding cultural diversity The State and local governments must endeavor to take measures such as for education, publicity, and correction of unreasonable institutions, etc. to ensure that Koreans and foreign residents in Korea understand and respect each other's history, culture, and institutions (Article 18 of the “Framework Act on Treatment of Foreigners Residing in the Republic of Korea”). 11. Support with proceeds from lottery ticket sales, etc. A part of the proceeds from lottery ticket sales and the lottery fund must be used for projects to support multicultural families (Article 23, paragraph 3, subparagraph 3 of the “Lottery Ticket and Lottery Fund Act”). -The web portal for multicultural families, Danuri (http://www.liveinkorea.kr), is managed under the support of the lottery fund to offer information on living in Korea and the Multicultural Family Support Center as well as counseling in foreign languages.by the ministry of government legistration  
    • English
    2020-03-18
  • Enrollment and transfer guide : For children who came to Korea after living abroad
         
    • English
    2020-03-18
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